Posts tagged Wonder Woman

Armageddon Dimplomacy Inferno 1.4

Video | Armageddon Diplomacy Inferno

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Armageddon Diplomacy Inferno

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Following some heated discussion on the two-page Armageddon Diplomacy story and art, at Bleeding Cool Forums, based on the item Rich Johnston carried at the main site, it was expected that the work might not be well received by everyone.

The thread, however, turned into a referendum on my character, artistic choices, my views on DC/Marvel and the comics industry, my general ability to communicate an idea, and even my sanity (which is nothing new in some comics circles) . The intensity seemed quite beyond the call of duty, one of the qualities that make fandom so engaging.  It’s a highly recommended, very informative and entertaining forum thread, so have a look if you get a chance.

But it all left me wondering how I can more clearly communicate what I’m trying to say, which I’m not so sure of myself, actually. And also what to do about the second page, which some forum members thought was so hateful that it warranted the extreme responses there.

So, I’ve decided that if that second page, depicting Superman, Batman and Wonder-Woman burning American, British and Israeli flags in Tehran, is such a hateful image, then perhaps it’s best for us to renounce our attachment to the original art. Or at least to unequivocally disassociate ourselves from it.

And to do so in a lasting way that leaves little doubt as to the strong sentiment some have heaped on it.

 

Photos by Elad Rath

 

I don’t know if it’ll work, but I’m hoping it clarifies what I’m trying to say and sets people’s minds at ease about it.

 

Now that this is behind us, the original art and positive message from the first page, along with a life size digital print of the complete second page, the original art of the consumed second page, and two photos from the process, are all available on eBay.

Starting bid was $10 for all items seen below. Click here to go to the auction.

Armageddon Diplomacy P1

Armageddon Diplomacy

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Considering the progressively progressive political atmosphere in the US and abroad, and the first step Superman took to reconcile his socio-political positioning on the world stage by announcing he’d renounce his US citizenship, one can’t help wonder where this idea is heading and what future ramifications it might hold for the Superheroes. Here’s a two page short depicting something we might well eventually see from DC Comics, perhaps in the not too distant future.

 

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Wonder Woman Sketch on eBay

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Click image to go to auction.

Green Arrow & Black Canary

Commission | GA/BC Passion

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It was commissioned by someone who has accompanied me and my career since we first met some 30+ years ago at a convention.  He asked that I not mention him by name if I can help it.  Well, it’s not easy because this good friend and avid supporter of my art since way back when, has waited patiently for years for this sketch. What’s more, and just like any other encounter we’ve had at conventions, he’s always stayed near, listening and talking about comics, the arts and artists . He is one of the more perceptive of the people I’ve spent time with and eschews the mad rush for artist popularity advanced by mainstream publishers because it ends up working to the detriment of most creators. In knowing all this, he strives to reward artists he admires far more handsomely than what the art market suggests.  It’s an honor and privilege to call such a man my friend.

Here is the commission, my first inking on paper in ages.  His art gallery can be seen here:

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Golden Age Wonder Woman

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Gene Colan Benefit Auction

Gene Colan Finish Pencils

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On its way to Clifford Meth.

Gene Colan Benefit Auction

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Vince Colletta Remembered

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Had Vince Colletta been the type of comics artist whose self esteem was dependent on his peers’ opinion of his work, it’s very likely that he would not have lasted out his career as a comics inker during the 60′s decade at Marvel.

Those familiar with the controversy over Coletta’s craftsmanship, know that perhaps no other comics creator has been the subject of personal and professional criticism of the type leveled at him. While he also elicits notable praise from the comics readership, many of the great artists whose work he embellished have been noted to say that he was the last choice they would make for an inker of their pencils, and such are not of the least flattering comments. Writer/historian Mark Evanier, of Colletta’s more vociferous critics, who led a charge to remove the inker from Jack Kirby assignments at DC in the early 70′s, explains his position here and here, in response to favorable commentaries on Colletta’s art by Eddie Campbell and Stuart Immonen.

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Artist Eric Larsen also posted an opinion on the debate, opening his short essay with the statement: “Vince Colletta was one of the most prolific inkers in the history of comics.” Considering the duality inherent in any controversey, the following quotation currently adorning Vinnie’s Wikipedia biography, stands out in its praise of his inking over Jack Kirby pencils in their critically acclaimed run on Thor during the 1960′s.  From Marvel Comics in the Silver Age, by writer and comics historian Pierre Comtoise:

. . . Colletta’s hair-thin, detailed inking style . . . seemed devoid of large areas of black, [which are] used to give figures weight and heft but an artistic concept yet to be fully explored by the time of the Middle Ages, an era whose crude woodcuts most reflected the art style needed by the Thor strip[. It] captured the elusive quality of otherworldly drama that the strip would increasingly demand as [Stan] Lee and [Jack] Kirby took it away from the everyday world of supervillains to a mythic plane where the forces of evil were on a far more gargantuan scale. Despite the serendipity of the two men’s styles, Colletta would later be criticized, with good reason, for compromising Kirby’s artistic vision by eliminating much of the detail that the artist put into his work. Be that as it may, what Colletta chose to keep, he rendered in such a way that showed off aspects of Kirby’s art that no inker before or since has ever been able to reproduce.

Our good friend Daniel Best has also posted extensively, and quite forthrightly, about the Colletta controversy over the years. Childhood comics reader “Dan McFan” dedicated an entire blog in praise of Colletta, named after his contentious view of Evanier and other detractors, where he cites a remark I once made at Imwan Forums about the personal nature of Vinnie’s reputation amongst his colleagues. Forum discussions such as this 98 page thread at Comicon.com, or these here, here, and here at The Comics Journal Message Boards, paint a largely accurate picture of the love/hate sentiment in comics fandom for the legacy and art of Vince Colletta.

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Immersed into the world of comic books at youth, I remember having a reverence for the Thor comics, much for the same reason cited by Pierre Comtoise. All that changed, however, as I edged closer towards fandom and came into contact with other aspiring artists. The mere mention of Vince Colletta was often synonymous with “the worst inker ever in comics”. The phenomenon only intensified when I became a professional artist working at Continuity. Still, Vinnie was art director at DC where I’d pretty much settled in as a penciler – and he was inking a great deal of books at the time. One can thus imagine my apprehension upon learning that he’d ink the fill-in issue of Wonder Woman, #232, that I penciled in 1976.
It wasn’t the type of apprehension based on an independent artistic assessment of the pros and cons of such a collaboration – rather on how that work would be viewed by the professional and fan community which largely saw Vinnie’s work in a negative light. In retrospect, I have nothing but good sentiment towards that project today as it’s clear to me that Vinnie’s sensitive line and professional experience contributed towards making that early work look a little better.  The same is true for a Flash story I penciled in World’s Finest Comics that Vinnie inked several years later.  There was a similar tension in the air then about Jack Abel inking my Legion of Super-Heroes stories, but it never reached the intensity that it did with Vinnie – perhaps because Jack was working from Continuity and was considered one of the good guys, while Vinnie was mostly villified as a distant “hack”,  worthy of the most dire slander as a destroyer of comics art, by the sometimes overly proud community of artists that we are.

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As a pertinent digression into the expectations that a comics penciler has regarding their work, it seems that submitting pencil art to be inked and colored by others is by itself a relinquishing of any rights the artist holds over the finished work. Though we should hope for the best effort possible by everyone contributing to the final product, the nature of the beast necessitates that we understand how unenforceable such expectations truly are. In that some artists are able to command a better personal result for their work, it cannot be said that any such collaboration is able to entirely satisfy a penciler’s expectations. This is inherent in the nature of a collaboration and has little to do with the degree of proficiency or artistic merit of an embellisher.

More so, there exists a quality to pencil art which an ink line can never capture for print, and which further stretches the divide between the potential inherent in the pencils and the finished product in a printed book. Thus, every inker must take a certain measure of liberty in order to interpret pencil art. And regardless of the degree of liberty taken, the finished product will never live up to any penciler’s vision for the potential their art holds for them. When compounding an independent artistic vision of an inker, such as Vinnie had, and considering his propensity for keeping the trains running on time, it’s more understandable how he’s come to evoke such a polarized range of sentiment regarding his work.

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This is not, however, about the artistic merit of Vince Colletta. Not about his 1950′s, mostly romance, comics which he penciled and inked exquisitely. Not about his subsequent inking for Marvel and DC beginning in the 1960′s, for which he gained the unflattering reputation. It is not even about whether it’s fair for a community of comics creators and fans to so injuriously malign one of our very own, whose contribution to the medium is indisputable.  No, good readers, this is not about any of these. It is only about the unfathomably resilient spirit of Vince Colletta. An artist who was more than confident about his approach to inking some of the best pencil art of his time. Certain of his own self esteem and unique uncompromising artistic vision, balanced by the time commitments he made. Resilient in that he never allowed his colleagues’ resentment of him to sway from the path he charted.  Good natured in that he never answered any of his detractors in kind, and maintained a warm and personable friendship with everyone whom he knew was maligning him behind his back.

It was a privilege and honor to have known and collaborated with you, Vinnie.  Time to join Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook and perhaps finally offer a copyright free image for your Wikipedia biography. If this portrait doesn’t quite live up to the standard of others I’ve drawn, the only explanation I have is that it’s the best I could do in the short time I could allow myself to do it.

I simply had to hack it out.

Vince CollettaPortraits of the Creators Sketchbook.

* Most images of Vinnie’s art borrowed with gratitude from “Dan McFan”

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